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View of Cayoosh Creek

Photograph depicts the confluence of the Cayoosh Creek outflow into the Fraser River in Lillooet, BC. Seton River is visible in the foreground. This area is Cayoose Creek Band (Sekw'el'wás First Nation) territory and includes land currently encompassed within Cayoosh Creek Indian Reserve 1. The Pacific Great Eastern Railway bridge over the Fraser River is also visible in the background.

Railway workers on Pacific Great Eastern #52 locomotive

Photograph depicts Pacific Great Eastern Railway #52 locomotive with railway workers posed on the locomotive for a posed portrait.

More information about the locomotive:
Pacific Great Eastern #52 locomotive was built by Montreal Locomotive Works in 1913 and delivered to the PGE in November of that year together with a second identical locomotive, Pacific Great Eastern #51. They were relatively light road locomotives of the Consolidation type (2-8-0 wheel arrangement) and, prior to dieselization of the railway in the late 1940s - early 1950s, were the only Montreal-built locomotives the railway owned. All subsequent steam locomotives built new for the Railway came from the Canadian Locomotive Company in Kingston, Ontario. There were also two earlier second-hand locomotives which the PGE acquired when it took over the Howe Sound & Northern Railway (previously the Howe Sound, Pemberton Valley & Northern Railway) and two additional steam locomotive purchased second-hand from the U.S.

Railway workers on Pacific Great Eastern #3 locomotive

Photograph depicts the Pacific Great Eastern Railway #3 locomotive from the Davenport Locomotive Works. Two railway workers lean against the front of the locomotive for a posed portrait. The individual at left may be Angus McRae, a PGE locomotive engineer.

More information about the locomotive, Pacific Great Eastern #3:
The locomotive was built by Davenport Locomotive Works in Davenport, Iowa in February 1914, serial number 1477, for Patrick Welch, one of the developers (Foley, Welch & Stewart) of the PGE railway. Most of the early equipment, although lettered with the Pacific Great Eastern name, was owned by Patrick Welch. The Provincial Archives in Victoria holds a document showing that Welch sold all the equipment to the newly incorporated Pacific Great Eastern Equipment Company, of which he was also a director, on 14 June 1916 in exchange for 6000 shares in the company. Much, if not all, of the equipment had PGEEC "ownership plates" applied during the 1916-1918 period. It was not until the Provincial Government acquired the railway (and the Equipment Company) in 1918 that the equipment actually became the property of the railway. Pacific Great Eastern #3 was a switching locomotive with an 0-6-0 wheel arrangement and eight-wheel tender built to a standard Davenport design.

Train in snow

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway locomotive in deep snow. A person, possibly a woman, stands near the train as snow continues to fall. The location is unknown, but may be Alta Lake or Squamish.

Alta Lake

Photograph depicts a couple in a row boat (likely the same couple depicted in image 2020.08.59) near Alta Lake shore docks and buildings. A rail line and a railway water tower are visible in the background. The water tank is a typical PGE 25,000 gallon water tank. The station would be a little over 400 feet south of the tank and is hidden by the stand of trees.

Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train on Pavilion Creek trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train on Pavilion Creek trestle at Mile 20.3. laden with workers, railway ties, and a steam donkey. The work train may be returning to a work camp, as a man dressed in the attire of a camp cook is standing beside the track.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a 389.4 foot long, 34 ft. high, framed trestle with 26 spans of 14.8 feet at Mile 20.3 carrying the line over Pavilion Creek. There was a water tank at Pavilion located between the North end of the siding and the South end of the trestle. A track profile chart confirms that the track at this point is on a 12 degree curve. This photograph was taken at trackside. The structures at the lower left of image 2020.08.82 are consistent with a small construction camp, which accounts for the presence of a camp cook in this image (2020.08.83).

"Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported in their January 1916 issue (p. 11, c.1), that track had been laid to within ½ mile of Clinton (Mile 45.0) on Dec. 14, 1915. If a constant rate of construction had been maintained from Mile 14, reached on July 30, 1915 as previously discussed, to Clinton, the approximate date of completion to Pavilion would be around the end of August, 1915 which is probably the earliest possible date for this photograph.

Pacific Great Eastern Railway train on Pavilion Creek trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway train on Pavilion Creek trestle at Mile 20.3. Also visible are a water tank and possibly the graveyard at Pavilion.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a 389.4 foot long, 34 ft. high, framed trestle with 26 spans of 14.8 feet at Mile 20.3 carrying the line over Pavilion Creek. There was a water tank at Pavilion located between the North end of the siding and the South end of the trestle. A track profile chart confirms that the track at this point is on a 12 degree curve. This photograph was taken from a vantage point up the hill to the North. The structures at the lower left of this image (2020.08.82) are consistent with a small construction camp, which accounts for the presence of a camp cook in image 2020.08.83.

"Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported in their January 1916 issue (p. 11, c.1), that track had been laid to within ½ mile of Clinton (Mile 45.0) on Dec. 14, 1915. If a constant rate of construction had been maintained from Mile 14, reached on July 30, 1915 as previously discussed, to Clinton, the approximate date of completion to Pavilion would be around the end of August, 1915 which is probably the earliest possible date for this photograph.

View of Seton Lake area

Photograph depicts a view of Seton Lake and the surrounding area, including the Pacific Great Eastern railway line. The railway grade is visible at left. Also visible is the Seton Lake fish hatchery at the east end of the lake and its employee boarding house, superintendent's cottage, and weir at the head of what was then referred to as "Lake Creek". The road seen in the centre foreground travelled from Lillooet to Seton Lake then to Golden Cache Mine.

Work train on Sallus Creek railway trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train on a trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. The work train appears to be carrying railway ties.

Photographs 2020.08.68, 2020.08.69, and 2020.08.70 are three views of track laying on the Sallus Creek trestle. These form a sequence: 2020.08.68, 2020.08.70, 2020.08.69 in order as track laying proceeds from the South end of the trestle toward the North end. The piece of equipment at the North end of the train in all three images is a track laying machine that lifted a piece of rail and delivered it to the workmen ahead of the machine. In this photograph, the machine is at the current end of track and is ready to advance the next length of rail."Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of late July 1915 as the date for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Work train on Sallus Creek railway trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train on a trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. The work train appears to be carrying railway ties. Railway workers work on the track behind the train with piles of unused rail ties nearby.

Photographs 2020.08.68, 2020.08.69, and 2020.08.70 are three views of track laying on the Sallus Creek trestle. These form a sequence: 2020.08.68, 2020.08.70, 2020.08.69 in order as track laying proceeds from the South end of the trestle toward the North end. The piece of equipment at the North end of the train in all three images is a track laying machine that lifted a piece of rail and delivered it to the workmen ahead of the machine. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of late July 1915 as the date for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Work train on Sallus Creek railway trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train on a trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. The work train appears to be carrying railway workers and a load of rails.

Photographs 2020.08.68, 2020.08.69, and 2020.08.70 are three views of track laying on the Sallus Creek trestle. These form a sequence: 2020.08.68, 2020.08.70, 2020.08.69 in order as track laying proceeds from the South end of the trestle toward the North end. The piece of equipment at the North end of the train in all three images is a track laying machine that lifted a piece of rail and delivered it to the workmen ahead of the machine. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of late July 1915 as the date for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Sallus Creek railway trestle

Photograph depicts the Pacific Great Eastern Railway trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of very late July 1915 or later as the earliest dates for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Sallus Creek railway trestle

Photograph depicts the Pacific Great Eastern Railway trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. A number of men are working along the trestle, possibly completing final construction work or performing repairs. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of very late July 1915 or later as the earliest dates for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Sallus Creek railway trestle construction

Photograph depicts a partially constructed Pacific Great Eastern Railway trestle located near Sallus Creek in the area around Lillooet, Fountain, and Pavilion. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of early-mid July 1915 as the latest date for this photograph.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Sallus Creek railway trestle with Mr. Crysdale on velocipede

Photograph depicts Mr. Crysdale sitting on a velocipede on the Sallus Creek ("14 Mile") Pacific Great Eastern Railway trestle with an estimated date of very late July 1915 or later. "Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported that track had been laid to 14 miles North of Lillooet by July 30, 1915 (CR&MW , Sept 1915, p341, c2). 14 miles North of Lillooet is approximately 20 rail lengths beyond the North end of this trestle, leading to a "best estimate" of very late July 1915 as the earliest date for this photograph. The velocipede depicted is a 3-wheel, manually propelled vehicle operated by a push-pull (back & forth) action on the actuating handle.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a Mile 13.7, 14 Mile Creek, frame trestle, 905 ft. long, 182 ft. high, 61 spans of 14.8 feet in the Lillooet Subdivision. A “PGE Track Profile” drawing shows this trestle was on a 1.55% grade and a 12 degree left hand curve. While the drawing had been revised at least twice (with an unknown date for the most recent revision), the pre-“Lillooet Diversion of 1931" mileage figures confirm that the 1915 “Mile 13.7" was in agreement with a more recent hand written note “Sallus Creek”. The trestle appears to have gone by the names "14 Mile" trestle, "13.7 Mile Trestle", and "Sallus Creek" trestle.

Special Train - PGE Railway

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway "Special Train" that is "carrying a number of members of B.C. Legislature on their tour of inspection. First train into Lillooet, B.C. Feb. 20, 1915, 5 p.m." The train is depicted on the grade along the Seton River as it leaves Seton Lake.

Pacific Great Eastern Railway work train

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway locomotive, caboose (C2), and train cars operating as a work train, possibly on the south side of the Sallus Creek cut. A steam shovel may be loading gravel to or from the train cars. Location appears to be around the Lillooet area. The locomotive appears to be #56, a Canadian Locomotive Corporation 2-8-0, which was later lost in an Anderson Lake accident on August 8, 1944.

Pacific Great Eastern Railway train on Pavilion Creek trestle

Photograph depicts a Pacific Great Eastern Railway train on Pavilion Creek trestle at Mile 20.3. The train includes Locomotive #56, built by Canadian Locomotive Company of Kingston, Ontario, in August 1914, together with caboose C2, built by National Steel Car of Hamilton, Ontario in 1914 and a “Hart Convertible Car” #140 stencilled with indeterminable initials. These cars were convertible gondolas which were used as ballast cars with the ability to dump ballast either between or outside the rails depending on whether the centre floor doors or the side doors were opened. This particular car, which was scrapped in 1949, was part of a group of 15 cars remaining in number series 131 - 195 (not all numbers used) known on the PGE as “Red Harts” to distinguish them from a somewhat more modern version in number series 201 - 240 (again, not all numbers used) known as “Black Harts”.

The ca. 1921-1927 “PGE Bridge List” from the notebook of William H. Hewlett (1914-1968) references a 389.4 foot long, 34 ft. high, framed trestle with 26 spans of 14.8 feet at Mile 20.3 carrying the line over Pavilion Creek. There was a water tank at Pavilion located between the North end of the siding and the South end of the trestle. A track profile chart confirms that the track at this point is on a 12 degree curve.

"Canadian Railway and Marine World" reported in their January 1916 issue (p. 11, c.1), that track had been laid to within ½ mile of Clinton (Mile 45.0) on Dec. 14, 1915. If a constant rate of construction had been maintained from Mile 14, reached on July 30, 1915 as previously discussed, to Clinton, the approximate date of completion to Pavilion would be around the end of August, 1915 which is probably the earliest possible date for this photograph.

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