Affichage de 12034 résultats

Archival description
Dossier Anglais
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Press Clippings: Judgement at Stoney Creek [background material]

File consists of: Newspapers (all dated 1976) include: The Times; The Citizen; The Sun; The Vancouver Sun; The Nechako Chronicle; Maclean's magazine Report titled: "A visit to Vanderhoof and Stoney Creek Reserve" by Remi J. De Roo, Chairperson, Human Rights Commission of British Columbia, September 24- 25, 1976 Incomplete copy of "Departmental policy - resource implications manpower services to Native people" from P.S. Hall, Branch Manager CMC Vanderhoof to W.F.J. Osborne, Sr. Manager, CMC Prince George, dated July 20, 1976. Handwritten draft (?) of "Specimen Form of Verdict" supp.1/15/69 Excerpt from article published in "Politics: National Indian Brotherhood" Report: "Inquest of Coreen Thomas, Vanderhoof, B.C. September 25, 26, 27, 28, 1976" submitted by Barbara Kobierski, Native Programs Section, Legal Services Commission.

The first "Little Rebellion" written 1964

File consists of "Two" (pages 12-15 typewritten and annotated pages), "Just for the Record..." (21 typewritten pages), and "A Minority of One" by Bridget Moran (26 typewritten pages).

A Little Rebellion - Promotion - Schools

File consists of: Open letter from Brian Lam, Managing Editor Arsenal Pulp Press Ltd. re: A Little Rebellion (Nov. 1993) Directory of Canadian Schools of Social Work Copies of article "Bridget Moran versus Wacky" (B.C. Bookworld, Winter 1992) Copies of article "Let's stop slandering welfare recipients" by Bridget Moran (The Vancouver Sun, July 23, 1993)
*Publication order forms for A Little Rebellion, Stoney Creek Woman, and Judgement at Stoney Creek.

Material for A Little Rebellion

File consists of: Misc. handwritten notes re: public policy and numbers Handwritten table comparing social work case loads in 1945, 1951, 1961, 1964, 1970 Handwritten notes re: social work case loads in 1945 Handwritten table "Who Gets What" re: areas of government expenditure Letter to Mrs. Kris Robinson from Norman Levi, Minister of Rehabilitation and Social Improvement (March 28, 1973) Fax sent to Jacqui Bobenic, Ministerial Assistant to Hon. Joan Smallwood, Minitery of Social Services Victoria from Bridget Moran re: request for information. Faxes from Rosemary McCullough at the Ministry of Social Services re: staffing for fiscal year 1991/92; FTE increase in basic field structure (April 27, 1992) Prince George Public Library microform photocopying order form submitted by Bridget Moran for copies from the Prince George Citizen newspaper (Nov. 28, 1991) and the following newspaper clippings: "Welfare children beaten but court action not impending" (Jan. 21, 1957); Letter to the Editor: "Shocked" (Jan. 24, 1957); "Welfare branch may charge former foster parents here" (Jan. 28, 1957); Out of the Mail Bag: "The Welfare Reply" (Jan. 28, 1957); "Foster parent trial delayed" (April 18, 1957) Prince George Public Library microform photocopying order form submitted by Bridget Moran for copies from the Prince George Citizen newspaper (Dec. 2, 1991) and the following newspaper clippings: "Couple charged after infant seized in cache" (April 26, 1960); "Woman charged with murder" (Aug. 15, 1960); "City woman gets another remand on murder charge" (Aug. 29, 1960); "$5,000 bail granted Mrs. Dorothy Tosoff" (Sept. 22, 1960); "Tosoff hearing opens in court here today" (Oct. 6, 1960); "Mrs. Tosoff freed of murder charge" (Oct. 7, 1960); "Malnutrition case opens" (Oct. 25, 1960); "Couple convicted of starving child" (Oct. 26, 1960); "Wades get jail - 1 and 2 years - for child neglect" (Oct. 31, 1960) Copy of letter written to Hon. Ray Williston from Bridget Moran (Feb. 12, 1964).

Justa Taping p.2-104

File consists of annotated transcript of interviews between Bridget Moran and Justa Monk.

"Where Winds Come Sweet" [A]

File consists of: Letter to Bridget Moran from Catherine Bush, Editorial Dept. for Macmillan of Canada re: rejection to publish (Dec. 30, 1981) Copy of letter to Bridget Moran from Marilyn Hancock, Editorial Assistant for Western Producer Prairie Books re: rejection to publish (Oct. 2, 1981) Copy of letter to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (Regina, Sask.) from Bridget Moran re: request to consider chapter from "Where Winds Come Sweet" entitled "Joy to the World" (Nov. 2, 1981) Synopsis of "Where Winds Come Sweet" "The Story About the Story" by Bridget Moran, re: "Where Winds Come Sweet" Manuscript: "Where Winds Come Sweet" by Bridget Moran (Chapters 1-11).

"The Horizontal Land"

File consists of a letter from Barbara Pulling, Editor, Douglas & McIntyre to Bridget Moran re: rejection to publish "The Horizontal Land" (May 22, 1992); a list of Families and Main Characters from "The Horizontal Land"; chapter Fourteen "The Teacher Cometh" excerpt from "The Horizontal Land."

"The Summer of '81"

File consists of a card from The Vancouver Sun rejecting offer to publish the attached four page manuscript "The Summer of '81" by Bridget Moran; newspaper clipping: "Bridget still in dark about her suspension" (The Citizen, Feb. 27, 1964).

Poetry

File consists of: "The Relief Cheque" Letter from J. Jill Robinson of Grain Magazine to Bridget Moran re: acceptance for "The Relief Cheque" (April 1, 1998) Speech (?) re: receipt of relief cheque Grain Magazine submission guidelines Letter to Bridget Moran from J. Jill Robinson of Grain Magazine re: Payment for publication of poetry submission; includes cheque stub for $30.00 and brochure "Ninth Annual Short Grain Writing Contest" Annotated draft of "The Relief Cheque" Covering page for "The Relief Cheque" Draft of "The Relief Cheque" featuring word count
*Photocopy of Grain Magazine cover and "Prose Poem Honourable Mention" to Bridget Moran for "The Relief Cheque."

Prince George Jail article

File consists of the "New Prince George jail can't solve old problem" (Current, October 1994) and the Pulp Press Fall Releases "News release: Judgement at Stoney Creek."

Homecoming

File consists of the original handwritten draft of "Diary of Success Homecoming" by Bridgie Drugan (Moran) (7 pages); the original list of people Bridget spoke with at the homecoming; a copy of handwritten draft of "Diary of Success Homecoming" by Bridgie Drugan (Moran) (7 pages); a copy of list of people Bridget spoke with at the homecoming.

Adulation [A]

File consists of: Card of thanks from Simon Fraser University Faculty of Education to Bridget Moran for her talk to SFU students (April 9, 1997) Handwritten student reactions from Bridget's visit to a Social Work class at the University of Victoria (Oct. 28, 1996) Letter from Corey Van't Haaff, Editor Wordworks, to Bridget Moran informing her of their intent to publish one of her articles (Oct. 1, 1997) Letter to Bridget Moran from Claudette Sandecki and a number of newspaper articles written by Claudette Sandecki and sent to Bridget for comment (July 24, 1997) Letter from Joan Givner to Bridget Moran re: their writing; copy of news release of Joan's book "The Self-Portrait of a Literary Biographer". (April 26, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran sent on behalf of Andrew Petter, Minister of Health and Minister Responsible for Seniors re: letter sent by Bridget re: medical services in Prince George (April 11, 1996) Letter of thanks to Bridget Moran from Jon Swainger, UNBC Professor, for her visit to his Fort St. John class (March 17, 1997) Letter to Bridget Moran from Linda re: thanks for visit to Granisle and for copy of her Cross Cultural Education speech (May 12, 1996) Thank you card to Bridget Moran from Val. for speaking to her classroom. Letter to Bridget Moran from Mike Harcourt, Premier of British Columbia re: thanks for advice (Jan. 25, 1996) Letter to Bridget Moran from Roisin Murtagh re: personal correspondence; includes 1 col. photograph (April 23, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Sherry Sissons, Prince George Public Library re: thanks for speaking engagement (Nov. 10, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Sallie [Bridget Sipos' mother] re: personal correspondence (Sept. 15, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Dr. Gordon Ternowetsky, UNBC Social Work Program re: thanks for Bridget's participation in developing social work program at UNBC (Oct. 6, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Victoria University, University of Toronto re: confirmation of participation in class reunion (1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Nancy Kroeker, Exec. Director The Writers' Development Trust re: thanks for participating in pilot high school reading project (Dec. 11, 1995) Card of congratulations to Bridget Moran from Jo Ann Hope. Christmas card to Bridget Moran signed Carol. Letter to Bridget Moran from Audrie Sands re: personal correspondence (April 14, 1995) Fan letter to Bridget Moran from Roisin Murtagh re: Stoney Creek Woman (March 18, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from "Invincible" (B.V. Reed) re: personal correspondence (Nov. 24, 1994) Letter of thanks to Bridget Moran from Jocelyn Peeling, YMCA Learning Opportunities (April 19, 1993) Letter to Bridget Moran from Corrina Tolmie re: personal correspondence (Dec. 7, 1993) [RESTRICTED] Notecard to Bridget Moran from the UNBC Social Work program re: thanks for participation in the consultation. Letter to Bridget Moran from Dr. Antonia Mills re: thanks for speaking engagement and cheque for honorarium (Feb. 1, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Carolyn Moore, Librarian Dease Lake Reading Centre, re: confirmation of dates for speaking engagement (July 5, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Paul Ramsay, Minister of Health and Minister Responsible for Senior re: thanks for participation in Task Force on Access to Contraception and Abortion Services. (Sept. 1, 1994) Card of thanks to Bridget Moran from Andrea re: gift of Stoney Creek Woman Note from Dr. Marianne Ainley to Bridget Moran re: thanks for lunch invitation. Letter to Bridget Moran from Jocelyn & Thelma re: thanks for coming to visit (July 5, 1993) Postcard to Bridget Moran from Lorna Crozier (?) re: thanks for the note (March 28, 1993) Letters to Bridget Moran from Nancy Bennett, freelance writer re: permission to use Stoney Creek Woman as a basis for a textbook chapter (June 21, July 17, Aug. 23, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Debbie Hartley, BCTLA Provincial Conference '95, re: Bridget's presentation at the conference (June 7, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Bev Olinigh (?) re: thanks for copy of Justa Letters of appreciation to Bridget Moran from students in the Aboriginal Women's Training Program, Hiiye'yu Lelum Society, re: Stoney Creek Woman. (Jan. 12, 1995) Card to Bridget Moran from Debra Critchley re: thanks for copy of Justa (Feb. 1995) Card of thanks to Bridget Moran from Star Fuoco, Malaspina College re: speaking engagement Letter to Bridget Moran from the Carnegie Reading Room re: reading engagement (Feb. 22, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Debra Critchley re: appreciation of work. (Jan. 12, 1995) Letter to Bridget Moran from Jill Cullen, Public Services Librarian, Prince George Public Library re: thank for gift of Justa to the Library (Dec. 14, 1994) Public newspaper announcements and poster for a writer's workshop to be held in Quesnel April 9, 1994. Card to Bridget Moran from Deborah Yaffe re: thanks for reading engagement (March 2, 1995) Card of thanks to Bridget Moran from the METIS Program re: speaking engagement Card of thanks to Bridget Moran from Lil & Willie re: attendance at wedding anniversary Letter to Bridget Moran from Betty Edwards re: thanks for inspiration (April 10, 1994) Letter to Bridget Moran from Bonnie, of Galitas Tapas and Wine Bar, re: conversation; includes coupons (Jan. 15, 1998) Notecard to Bridget Moran from Jacqueline Baldwin re: I love you. Thank you card to Bridget Moran from staff & clients of Carrier Sekani Family Services (Aug. 1997) Letter to Bridget Moran from Marilyn Webster-Beaton, Secretary, for the Association Advocating for Women and Children, re: thank you for donation. (Sept. 12, 1997) Thank you card to Bridget Moran from Vancouver - Cuba Friendshipment re: thank you for donation
*Conference program: "Bridging the Gap" Youth Conference at the North Peace Cultural Centre, Fort St. John; opening address by Bridget Moran (March 12-13, 1998).

Adulation [B]

File consists of: Xpresspost parcel to Bridget Moran from Francis Wellsch re: personal correspondence [some RESTRICTED], Wellsch family photographs, newspaper clipping re: Wellsch family members, tourist pamphlets on Saskeatchewan, Wellsch family history. Christmas card to Bridget Moran from Kathy Coney (?) Christmas card to Bridget Moran from Project Friendship (1995) Card to Bridget Moran from Claire Letter to Bridget Moran from Nancy Bennett re: textbook completion (Nov. 21, 1995) Large card "A New Beginning" to Bridget Moran from Geraldine Thomas re: thank you for support. Letter to Bridget Moran from Catherine Card-Hay (former Victoria University classmate?) re: personal correspondence; includes VIC Report, Winter 1995/96 which has a short write-up on Bridget Moran and her achievements. Birthday card to Bridget Moran from Star Weiss Fuoco re: 75th Birthday wishes Card to Bridget Moran from Rita Mois (?) re: Bridget's resignation from the Federation of Writers Board. (Aug. 20, 1998) Sympathy card to Bridget Moran from ? re: condolence for the loss of Bridget's sister Letter to Bridget Moran from Brenda Massini re: writing (Sept. 16, 1998) Card to Bridget Moran from Lyn Ivens (?) re: congratulations for honourable mention for prose poem (Sept. 4, 1998) Card to Bridget Moran from Mary Clark re: gratitude for Prince George Remembered Letter to Bridget Moran from Ken and Betty Rutherford re: personal correspondence (Sept. 4, 1998) Get well card to Bridget Moran signed by many Thank you letter and lapel pin to Bridget Moran from Dorothea, Island Mountain Arts festival Birthday card to Bridget Moran from Judy & Don re: 75th Birthday Birthday card to Bridget Moran from Cis re: 75th Birthday Typed letter to be faxed to Sylvia from Bridget Moran re: Bridget's health after contracting pneumonia (Jan. 25, 1999) Typed letter to be faxed to Lucette from Bridget Moran re: Bridget's health after contracting pneumonia (Jan. 25, 1999) Thank you card to Bridget Moran signed by many. Letter to Bridget Moran from Teresa Saunders, Coordinator for New Caltec Faculty Associate team, Simon Fraser University re: thanks for work with the team (March 2, 1998) Card to Bridget Moran from Arleigh Slanina (?) re: thanks for encouragement (March 30, 1998) Letter to Bridget Moran from Donna Creamore re: inspiration for activism after reading Stoney Creek Woman (April 2, 1998) Postcard to Bridget Moran from Mussi re: thanks for participation in Aboriginal Ed. Conference (1998) Birthday card to Bridget Moran from daughter Roseanne re: 75th Birthday Birthday card to Bridget Moran from daughter Mayo re: 75th Birthday Letter to Bridget Moran from Dene Law Centre e: gratitude for support (June 4, 1998).

Writer's Workshop Schedule

File consists of a notebook containing: addresses, names, phone numbers, teaching notes and records from Writing Workshop, Wells, B.C. - schedules, writing assignments, section copy of "On Writing Well" by William Zinsser, "The Ten Commandments for a Writer", "Writer's Block" from Anybody Can Write.

Writers Workshop - Oral History

File consists of: Annotated transcript of interview with Justa Monk [Chapter?] "Eight" of Justa edited by Mayo Moran [Chapter?] "Eight" of Justa edited by Roseanne Moran [Chapter?] "Eight" of Justa edited by unidentified individual [Chapter?] "Eight" of Justa edited by Linda Maupassant, Guy de. The Necklace. London: Phoenix, 1996.

Research Files - Miscellaneous Background Research

File consists of: Letter from H.G. Page, Chief, Vital Statistics Section, Dominion Bureau of Statistics to Bridget Moran re: her request for statistics on suicides among aboriginals (August 25, 1970); accompanied with a chart showing number of suicides by province for 1967 and 1968; and a report "Some Selected Statistics on Suicide". Two copies of a report to the Standing Committee of Council on Health and Welfare, City of Vancouver, re: Welfare and Rehabilitation Department - Brief from Children's Aid society of Vancouver. Re: Social Assistance and Related Services (October 1, 1970).

Poverty

File consists of "Fighting Poverty Kit" including: numerous fact sheets, newsletters and articles compiled or produced by End Legislated Poverty and newspaper clippings from The Citizen (1998).

Child Welfare

File consists of a newspaper clipping: "Injured B.C. baby forces foster care changes" (The Citizen, April 29, 1998).

Book marks

File consists of Book marks [advertising Bridget Moran's publications].

Social Work skit

File consists of Social Work skit (1959) [written by Moran?] "Funrunner's Fabulous Fling (In Casework)."

Dimitri Goritsas

File consists of: Letter to Bridget Moran from Dimitri Goritsas re: production Judgement at Stoney Creek into a feature film "Statement of Intent" towards the production Judgement at Stoney Creek into a feature film submitted by Demitri Goritsas, Joseph Balint, and Randy Fred Fax from Demitri Goritsas [and Joseph Balint ?] to Geraldine Thomas (March 1996) Copy of letter to Bernard Zukerman of CBC Toronto from Bridget Moran re: production of Judgement at Stoney Creek as a feature film (March 3, 1992) Letter from Sheri Goegan, Communications Assistant, Audience Relations for the CBC to Bridget Moran (Feb.11, 1992) Copy of letter to Donna Wong-Juliani from Bridget Moran re: production of Judgement at Stoney Creek as a feature film (Sept. 9, 1992).

Album #3: newspaper clippings and personal correspondence, 1964

File consists of: Newspaper clipping: "Welfare: Are you tired of it?" (The Citizen, Feb. 19, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Welfare Minister in Hot Water" by Douglas Collins (Globe and Mail) Newspaper clipping: "Political Cartoon" Newspaper clipping: "Editorial - Ye Olde Violin" (Prince George Progress, Feb. 20, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (Prince George Progress, Feb. 27, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "City Welfare Workers Axed" (The Citizen, Feb. 18, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Aldermen Request Report on Welfare" (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Social Work Class Told 'Avoid B.C.'" (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "'Northern Social Workers Speak'" (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Four suspended workers get their jobs back" (Prince George Citizen, Feb. 24, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "4 Social Workers Get Jobs Back" (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (The Citizen, Feb. 28, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor (The Citizen, Feb. 25, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (The Citizen, Feb. 27, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (The Citizen, Feb. 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (The Citizen, Feb. 26, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (The Citizen, Feb. 27, 1964) Letter of support to Bridget Moran from the University of Victoria Pre-Social Work Club, Donald E. Bell, Program Chairman (Feb. 20, 1963) Newspaper clipping: "Welfare slipped for years" (The Citizen, Feb. 25, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor"(Vancouver Sun) Newspaper clipping: "Moran in 'lions den'" (The Citizen, March 18, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Bridget refuses to keep quiet" (The Citizen, Feb. 28, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Socreds reject debate on B.C. welfare crisis" (The Citizen, Feb. 19, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Moran caseload spread among other workers" (The Citizen, March 17, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Mrs. Moran's Work Split by Department" (Daily Colonist, Victoria, march 18, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Temporary worker gone" Newspaper clipping: "Pressure on Welfare" (Daily Colonist, Victoria, March 19, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Socred MLAs Lash Socreds" (Daily Colonist, Victoria, March 19, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Bridget finished for good, result of explosive scene" (Prince George Citizen, March 20, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Welfare Rush Anti-Climax" (Daily Colonist, Victoria, March 20, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the editor" (Lillooet News, April 16, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Bridget to write her story" (The Citizen, April 20, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "'Sick attitude' hit by social worker" (The Province, May 9, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Trip Delays Moran Plea" (Vancouver Sun, May 21, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Editorial" by James Nesbit (Vancouver Sun, Feb. 25, 1964) Newspaper clipping: "Bridget Moran Makes New Bid For Return To Old Position" (The Citizen, March 7, 1966) Letter from Bridget Moran to Black re: no job available (March 2, 1966) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (Vancouver Sun) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the Editor" (Vancouver Sun) Newspaper clipping: "Martyred Social Worker Asks Gaglardi for Justice" (Victoria Daily Times, Feb. 22, 1968) Newspaper clipping: "'Justice-Minded' Phil Gets Plea" Newspaper clipping: "One Family Cost Taxpayer $500, 000 in 22 Years" (Vancouver Sun, march 1968) Newspaper clipping: "Social worker struggles back" (The Province, Oct. 25, 1968) Newspaper clipping: "Letters to the editor" Newspaper clipping: Photo of Bridget Moran (The Citizen, Oct. 1968) Letter to Bridget Moran from the Prince George Regional Hospital regarding employment (July 12, 1968) Newspaper clipping: Political cartoon Newspaper clipping: "Welfare protest halts legislature" (Vancouver Sun, 1972)
*Poverty Is Big Business: paper presented to Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association of Social Workers by Bridget Moran (June 1973).

Newspaper Clippings (1968-1970)

File consists of: Newspaper clipping: "Horse radish in the corn flakes" by Bridget Moran (North Star, June 20, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "The dignity of humanity?" by Bridget Moran (North Star, June 23, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, July 15, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "A basic difference in attitude" by Bridget Moran (North Star, June 27, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Sept. 9, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Aug. 19, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Sept. 23, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Oct. 29, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Oct. 22, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "Native History Neglected, Ridiculed" by Bridget Moran (New Leaf, June 1971) Newspaper clipping: "All About Welfare Bums" by Bridget Moran (New Leaf, August 1971) Newspaper clipping: "B.C. Has Its Own Style of a Disaster" by Bridget Moran (date unknown) Newspaper clipping: "The Reserve: Cradle or Coffin?" by Bridget Moran (The Citizen, Jan. 15, 1969) Newspaper clipping: "The Demise of The Geriatric Square" by Bridget Moran (The Citizen, Nov. 28, 1968) Newspaper clipping: "What is Your Preference: No Prejudice or No Food?" by Bridget Moran (date unknown) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, July 29, 1970) Handwritten letter to Allan Fotheringham (?) from Bridget Moran re: free-lance writing for the Vancouver Sun (date unknown) Handwritten notes by Bridget Moran re: Home Acquisition Grant and affordable housing (date unknown) Newspaper clipping: "Allan Fortheringham" (Vancouver Sun) Newspaper clipping: "frankly speaking" by Bridget Moran (North Star, Aug. 26, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "My Backbone Is Great And My Soul Is Rested" by Bridget Moran (Vancouver Sun, Mar. 11, 1967) Newspaper clipping: "Horse radish in the corn flakes" by Bridget Moran (North Star, June 20, 1970) Newspaper clipping: "Horse radish in the corn flakes" by Bridget Moran (North Star, June 20, 1970).

Justa: A First Nations Leader (proof copy)

File consists of the proof copy of Justa: A First Nations Leader. This Arsenal Pulp Press proof copy was transferred to the Archives from the Geoffrey R. Weller Library. Along with this spiral bound proof copy came a postcard from Wendy at Arsenal Pulp Press addressed to Bob Harkins; the postcard reads as follows: "Bob Harkens[sic], I know you're talking to Bridget about medic (?). Here is a gallery of her new book. Let me know if you have any questions. Wendy" This proof copy, along with this postcard were included in this fonds as the proof was created by Bridget Moran and it was felt to have more merit if included in the Moran fonds, even though it was a copy presumably received by Bob Harkins.

Stoney Creek Journal Chapters 1 – 10

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Brian”- Letter to Brian and Linda (last names not written) regarding the publication of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter One” -Draft re: Mary John’s family tree and her first memories of childhood “Chapter Two”- Draft re: Mary John’s childhood memories; description of Stoney Creek village “Chapter Eight”- Draft re: Mary John’s first potlatch; her first experience with racism “Expense”- Letter from Bridget Moran concerning the amount of her rent “Chapter Five”- Draft re: Mary John’s time at Lejac “Chapter Four”- Draft re: first memories of going to residential school “Introduction”- Introduction to Stoney Creek Woman “Memorandum of Agreement”- Agreement of publishing and monetary rights between Mary John and Bridget Moran “Chapter Nine”- Draft re: Mary John’s arranged marriage to Lazare John “Pictures”- A list labeling the photographs found in Stoney Creek Woman “Prologue”- A quote from Adnas Alexis describing how Carrier language and customs has passed from generation to generation “Quotes”- A list of the quotes used in Stoney Creek Woman “Resume”- Resume for Bridget Moran “Chapter Seven”- Draft re: the terror of having to return to Lejac “Chapter Six”- Draft re: more on Lejac; how a day school was requested year after year “Synopsis”- A list of the contents and chapters of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter Ten”- Draft re: Mary John in the early days of her marriage to Lazare John; the relationship with her mother-in-law “Chapter Three”- re: Mary John’s childhood memories, particularly Christmas and hunting with her stepfather “Dedication”- Dedication to Helen Jones, Mary John’s daughter
*“A Step or Two in her Moccasins”- Why Bridget Moran wrote Stoney Creek Woman

Disk0005 – ANCESTOR

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Introduction” -Intro to a transcript re: pioneer days in Prince George “Colleges”- Form letter providing information on A Little Rebellion from Aresenal Pulp Press “Cross Culture Education”- Speech given to unknown audience re: aboriginal education “Eileen”- Song/poem dedicated to Eileen Temperley “Five”- Transcription re: changes in Prince George after 1910 “Four”- Transcription re: BC Express “Kamloops”- Letter to Terry Grieve re: talking to students about Stoney Creek Woman “The Nechako and Me”- Describing traveling on the Nechako River “Northern Lights”- Letter to Northern Lights College Networks Conference re: cross cultural education “PG History”- Transcription re: stories of coming to Cariboo country “Prince George Remembered”- Publishing information for Prince George Remembered “About the Author”- Biography of Bridget Moran “Prince George Remembered 2”- Title page for Prince George Remembered “Prince George Remembered 3”- Dedication page “Reunion”- Letter to Verna and Gloria (last names unknown) “Six”- Transcription re: life in the Cariboo “Income Tax Statement 1991”- Tax statement “Income Tax Statement 1992”- Tax statement “Income Tax Statement 1993”- Tax Statement “Income Tax Statement 1994”- Tax Statement “Income Tax Statement 1995”- Tax Statement “Income Tax Statement 1996”- Tax Statement “Income Tax Statement 1997”- Tax Statement “Three”- Transcription re: life and work in the Cariboo
*“Two”- Transcription re: life and work in Prince George

Disk0010 – Family

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files:
*“Twenty”- Planning a family reunion (a couple sentences long)

Disk0015 – Stoney Creek Woman Drafts

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Chapter 1” - Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 2”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter Three”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 4”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 5”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 6”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 7”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman “Chapter 8”- Draft of Stoney Creek Woman
*“Chapter Potlatch”- Potlatch Draft of Stoney Creek Woman

Disk0020 - Granny Sey[mour] Oct/95

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Granny 1”- Transcript of conversation with Granny Seymour “Granny 2”- Transcript of conversation with Granny Seymour
*“Sick ‘99”- Letter to Sylvia (last name unknown) re: being sick

Disk0024 - Horizontal Land (4) copy Chap 21 - Chap 23 (inclusive) end.

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Chap 21”- Now We Are Nine Draft “Chap 22”- Aunt Annie Cometh Draft “Chap 23”- The Gunthers Are Back! Draft “End 21”- Draft “End 22”- Draft “End 23”- Draft “Mid 22”- Draft “Mid 23”- Draft

Disk0032 - Judgement at Stoney Creek August 4/89 Disk Three

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Eighteen”- Draft “Introduction”- Draft of introduction “Nineteen”- Draft of Chapter Eighteen “Seventeen”- A note on editing and writing Chapter Seventeen “Twenty”- Chapter Nineteen Draft “Two Five”- Chapter Twenty Four Draft “Two Four”- Chapter Twenty Three Draft “Two One”- Chapter Twenty Draft “Two Six”- Epilogue Draft “Two Two”- Chapter Twenty One Draft
*“Two Three”- Chapter Twenty Two Draft

Disk0040 - Justa Putting it together Disk 1

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Lejac”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Lejac 2”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Lejac 3”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Lejac 4”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Lejac 5”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Lejac 6”- Transcript of interview with Justa Monk “Promo 1”- Praise for A Little Rebellion “Sixteen”- Chapter Sixteen Draft “Voices”- Paragraph on welfare recipients “Voices 1”- Address for Vancouver Sun re: Voices

Disk0042 – A Little Rebellion

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Eleven”- Chapter Eleven Draft “Epilogue”- Draft “One 3”- Chapter Thirteen Draft “One 4”- Chapter Fourteen Draft “One 5”- Chapter Fifteen Draft “One 6”- Chapter Sixteen Draft “One 7”- Chapter Seventeen Draft “One 8”- Chapter Eighteen Draft “One 9”- Chapter Nineteen Draft “Twelve”- Chapter Twelve Draft
*“Two O”- Chapter Twenty Draft

Disk0044 - A Little Rebellion - Disk One

File consists of one 5.25" floppy disk, containing the following files: “Eight”- Chapter Eight Draft “Five”- Chapter Five Draft “Four”- Chapter Four Draft “Jacqui”- Letter to Jacqui Bobenic re: questions “Mystery”- Chapter One Draft “Nine”- Chapter Nine Draft “One”- Chapter One Draft “Prologue”- Draft “Seven”- Chapter Seven Draft “Six”- Chapter Six Draft “Three”- Chapter Three Draft “Title”- Title page
*“Two”- Chapter Two Draft

Mary John & Bridget Moran, College of New Caledonia – March 12, 1991

File consists of a videocassette (VHS) recording of Mary John & Bridget Moran at the College of New Caledonia, March 12, 1991.

Videocassette Summary

Context: Bridget Moran and Mary John speaking to students at CNC, specific class unidentified.

Introduction: Bridget identifies that she will make the introductory speech and Mary will answer any questions because Mary doesn’t like to make speeches even though she is very good at it. Bridget’s connection with Mary and with Stoney Creek Reserve: Bridget Moran (BM) came to Prince George in 1954 as a social worker and soon after went to the Stoney Creek reserve. At that time the Indian Agent was in control of reserves and social workers were only called on to a reserve if they had to remove a child that was been abused or neglected. The state of reserves was horrible. BM made a promise to her mother that she would at some point do something about the impoverished state of reserves. In 1964 she was suspended by the provincial govt. for speaking out against current social policy. After writing her second published book Judgement at Stoney Creek she met Mary through Mary’s daughter Helen. Helen felt that Mary’s life was typical and yet a bit more significant than the average native woman and so approached Bridget to write a book about her mother’s life. BM put it off due to her busy career in social work. About 1983-84 Mary got sick and BM was afraid she wouldn’t have chance to capture Mary’s life story. So she took her motor home out to Stoney Creek and recorded Mary’s story – Mary beaded, while she knitted and they just talked. Once the book was written, BM’s daughter Roseanne became BM’s agent. After inquest in 1976 she had started 2nd published book Judgement at Stoney Creek but her publishers were not supportive of publishing books about Natives at that time. BM then wrote Stoney Creek Woman (SCW) and published it; after which time Judgement was better received. SCW now recommended in schools. Since publication they have done many talks across the province. Writing SCW was hard but wonderful in that Mary was able to share her feelings with BM. When the book was coming out Mary was very nervous, it came out on Nov. 12, 1988. Mary read the book and was really angry about reliving what had happened to her people. BM talks about thoughts of a 2nd book re: Mary’s thoughts on the environment and her culture. BM gives Mary the floor for questions.

[Note: most student questions were inaudible and so only replies have been noted below]

MJ: She was very upset about the Supreme Court decision. She speaks about how free her people used to be. They could stop and make camp anywhere – this was no longer the case as all is private property. There are greater alcohol problems in north. They are holding workshops in Stoney Creek to help the young people. The older people know what to do, beadwork, etc. the young people don’t like to do traditional tasks, even for cash. The elders try to teach them. She has about 5 boys working doing wood for elders but they have no axe so she had to get one for them They are so poor on reserves. The elders try everything – elders tried a wood processing plant - for 10yrs they studied this. Had people from Switzerland and Germany lined up who wanted the wood but they still didn’t get anywhere.

BM: People are now living better in Stoney Creek. When she first visited a reserve tuberculosis (TB) was rampant. In 1954 so many people had TB and they were all treated away from home. This left people at home (mainly women) to raise the children by themselves. We have social network now that was not existent in ’54. Still compared to the majority of society, reserve conditions are comparable to living conditions in the 3rd world.

MJ: Some reserves like Ft. Ware are just desperate. One night staying in a medical house, a child 10 or 11 was wondering around at night in the rain. When they got up in morning and he came into the centre and had breakfast. They asked him why he was outside all night. He said he was trying to catch horses. This boy was enamored with the cowboy hat and leather jacket another boy there was wearing. This other boy told him he would buy a hat and coat for him when he returned home. By the time the package was sent, the young boy was dead from sniffing gas.

BM: People are depressed and alcohol and drugs is one way to cope

MJ: Men drinking early in morning, she talked to them. One guy hadn’t worked a day in his life. She asked him why he drinking. One guy says he just drinks once and awhile that is wasn’t a problem. The other guy left as didn’t want to hear the truth. She says they need a job – something to live for.

MJ: She tells children to get educated and then come back to the reserve and help their people - like Eddie John and Archie Patrick did. [Discussion on environment]: The Elders group comes together and talks about environment: how the earth is being stripped dry. This worries them. The animals are not there. Years ago, they were so poor, they just had basic food. Their cupboard was in the bush, they were so busy trying to make a living while the men were out logging trying make money. The men logged by hand and the land still looks untouched. That is how they earned a living, and the land is not scarred.
Years ago people were not fearful of sickness, there was no sickness, and there were hardly any accidents as everyone was so used to the bush. The only thing her people feared was starvation. After the 1918 flu many orphans were left. One old lady took them in and had hardly any food herself. In the spring she had a cache in ground she had buried there. She sent 2 children to it to dig it up. When the children brought the supplies back to camp the old woman gave ½ fish to each child. They were like hungry dogs. The elders keep telling people, when hunting/fishing don’t waste anything in fear of starvation. One old lady said they were starving and went into bush and found mouse droppings and even that they cooked. With a moose, you eat all of it, right down to the marrow.

MJ: The elders organized themselves and did workshops to learn how to help their young people. Many deaths among young people.

BM: Suicide rate among natives is 2-3x’s higher than among non-natives

MJ: The elders have tried everything to help with the problems of young people. But the youth drift away as they have no interest.

BM: One of the psychiatrists she talked to said that one of the best preventions for suicide is for kids to have a goal to work towards. Native youth have no goals, no education, no jobs, nothing to look forward to.

MJ: Her daughter doesn’t like to be on welfare. She was searching for job. The Elders gave her a job watching over traps but this had to be shut down due to lack of money for furs. She then put her name in as a janitor for the highschool in Vanderhoof but was turned down. MJ furious because they [the white people] in that school wouldn’t even let her daughter clean up their shit!

BM: Northern communities with large native populations, like Ft. St. James or Vanderhoof, rely on the money brought in by the native community; yet most businesses don’t employ natives. The natives have to realize their own economic power.

MJ: The elders started a bingo night and were going to hold a fishing derby. They sent a young man into Vanderhoof to find donations for the derby. He went to the Elks club and was told he’d get nothing there because Stoney Creek took away their bingo night. Her people had supported them [the Vanderhoof bingo night] for years and years before, but as soon as the natives had their own bingo night they were not supporting the one in Vanderhoof anymore.

MJ: She told her husband she was going to PG to talk about the book. He has no problem with it.

BM: Lazare doesn’t read or write.

MJ: He went to school at Lejac for 2 years. Now all he can do is sign his name. It’s sad.

BM: Joanne Fisk just completed PhD, she teaches at Dalhousie but she used to spend summers in Stoney Creek and she did her thesis on Lejac. Her thesis was that residential schools were of some help to girls but were disastrous for boys. The girls learned to read and write; while few boys came out of residential schools who could read or write. All they did was hard work out in the fields. When preparing for Judgement, she spoke with Coreen Thomas’ father. He attended Lejac for 6 years, he was beaten and worked like a horse, and he couldn’t read or write. He cried for 2 hrs when BM told him she was going to write a book about his daughter. Sophie Thomas, however, felt she learned a lot out of Lejac – how to sew, read and write and make bread. Men learned nothing to help them make a living.

MJ: Last fall, there was a conflict between town and reserve children. Vanderhoof citizens didn’t want reserve children attending the town school. It cooled down. The school on reserve only teaches kindergarten, and grades 1-3.

MJ: Her daughter-in-laws, Gracie and Mary are teaching. The elders are going to have a summer camp at Wedgewood fish camp. It is going to be a survival camp.

MJ: They have dancers. They try to revive the language and culture. There aren’t too many storytellers. Selina and Veronica are two elders who are good storytellers. She’s going to try and get hold Veronica and tape one of her stories, she has taped 3 of them already. The elders are training the teachers (of language) and working on dictionaries and some books.

MJ: The population on her people is about 500 and increasing. Most people are out in towns, like Vanderhoof, and PG. There are about 400 people living on reserve but housing is really bad.

MJ: She says her people were trying to get a grant to get money for wood processing. The Swedish people had their own plans. There was a place on reserve with a railroad that was all set up for wood processing but the DIA had a problem with the funding. The band hired a consultant in Burnaby to put their proposal together. The DIA said they would hire Price Waterhouse to study the study the band produced and there it stayed.

MJ: Her son Ernie started logging on the reserve in ’78 or ‘79. He hired boys from the reserve. Somehow DIA got in and said his work was a conflict and that he couldn’t log on reserve. He already had all the heavy equipment. Her son-in-law, a white man, a businessman living on reserve had helped Ernie to get all this machinery. After the DIA came in, they took this logging business away from him, he lost his machinery. He was so desperate, she thought he would commit suicide. He left for Ft. St. James. She was so worried. The DIA needed him to sign some papers but a friend they had within the DIA told Ernie not to sign these papers so Ernie ran. Mary was so angry at the DIA she felt ready to kill, she even had a big rock in her hand when the DIA came looking for her son. Her daughter told her not to do it. Ernie refused to sign. He lost all the machinery. That is where the DIA puts us.

BM: CBC did a series after Oka, looking at Natives across the country trying to start businesses, and in every case they were sabotaged. As long as natives are poor and uneducated, a lot of people in DIA have good jobs.

MJ: Reserve stories pretty hard. Her people tried ranching, they had 150 head of cattle. Years ago an Indian agent, a good man, told her to start ranching on reserve. He’d give them so many acres on CP land
– “certificate of possession”. Some people still have CP land and they can do what they like with it, but they can’t sell it.

BM: There are divisions among natives. She was interviewed by reporter to talk about how there wasn’t one cohesive voice speaking for all natives. She said that was hard, and that natives, as with white people, don’t speak with one voice – just look at the Legislature. Different groups among natives? Of course.

MJ: Years ago, one family lived in one house and got along. It is not the same anymore - family separates so much. Children are taken away. When she got married she lived with 3 families in one house. Long ago there would live one clan in one long house and everyone got along.

MJ: In 1970, her people were allowed to send children to catholic schools in town only. The children were not allowed in public schools. So she went to Ottawa to lobby for the freedom to send native children to any schools they want. She talked to Chretian, the then Minister of Education. Since then they have had that freedom.

MJ: Some families have tried everything: Christian schools, public schools. She’s not sure where they are sending children now - public school is a bad influence! (laughs). Families often sendthei children to Christian schools. There is a high drop out rate. She’s not sure why. In public schools children have choice of what to take. Young people are not “with it”. When children graduate…she took some teenage dancers to Missouri one year. She asked these children where they were, and some said USSR and she says they are not “with it”. They didn’t know anything about the country they were in.

BM: Recently she spoke with teachers and found out that 20% of students at PGSS are now native and yet there is not one native teacher. She found in last 5-7 years, more native people have been coming to PG so as to give their children a better education. But the education system isn’t supportive of them and their children go under. There is one native counselor at PGSS - that’s it. Teachers they talked to spoke to Mary about the differences and frustrations they had with the way native children were raised; such as how native children will look at the floor when speaking to teachers and will then get into trouble.

MJ: Children are taught not to look into eyes as this is like a challenge to the person speaking. They must look down at their own feet and humble themselves. That’s a problem. She says they have to trust [the teachers?]. When a native student is in school and having problems, it helps them to be able to talk to another native person.

MJ: Trust is hard with white people.

MJ: As long as there are reserves, people stay on reserves. Natives get lost in society when they go to towns.

MJ: She will go anywhere to get what she needs from the bush. In the bush she feels close to the earth and at home, she doesn’t feel that way in PG.

BM: Mary and her went to Vancouver in the spring of ’89. Mary stayed with her daughter-in-law at UBC and she couldn’t wait to get back to reserve to find something to do!

MJ: She couldn’t do anything, it was just like a chicken coop. You can’t work outside. She would die if had to stay in a place like that.

BM: The chances of native culture surviving is so much better now than it was 30-40 years ago. It came close to dying out. There is now a pride in being native and an interest in being native that wasn’t there when she started in social work. Back then people were almost ashamed of being native.

MJ: She agrees with Bridget. Many times she was ashamed of her food, the way they talked, everything was against us. Many young people she speaks with are coming back to reserves. In the ‘20-‘30s, her sister-in-law married a non-status Indian and from then on felt she was different because she could go to liquor store, etc. She became ashamed to be seen with Indians. She wouldn’t talk to them on street but would accept them in her home.

MJ: In the potlatch system, her sister-in-law is a higher rank than she is. It would cost MJ a lot of money to raise her status within their clan system. Her sister-in-law is a spokes person in their clan but she had to pay for it. She was given a name and a song. She has to look after her behaviour and all that. She asked Mary to make a blanket for her son many years ago. MJ had been watching him and he wasn’t behaving well. Finally she made that blanket but for another person because he wasn’t ready. He has to behave himself.

MJ: Her children would take her clan, not Lazare’s clan. You cannot marry into your own clan – they are like brother and sister, if that is going to happen they have to separate from the clan.

MJ: They are trying to include all young people. They have a white man married to a native girl, who is very active with the elders and he is a drummer now. They are going to initiate them into her clan.
Another one is also very good with elders. His grandfather is pure Indian but married a white women and so lost much native blood. But now he wants to learn all about his culture. She has all his grandfather’s regalia as he had no one to receive it, but she intends on giving it to his grandson.

BM: The culture is still alive at Stoney Creek. Things are still done in the old way. It is sad that the non- native world cannot see this culture alive.

MJ: If you have a problem, you would ask the family in opposite clan to help you. Such as money for a sick child to go to Vancouver for operation. Or with a funeral, like when her daughter Helen died, people helped her. People helped out while she was watching daughter in hospital, then they paid for the funeral. One year later, her clan put up potlatch and paid back all that was done for her family. In the clan system there is always someone to help.

BM: At the potlatch she attended their were clan members that came from all over BC

MJ: No negative things came from publishing this book. Although one doctor, Dr. Mooney said there wasn’t separate wings for whites and natives at the Vanderhoof hospital. But she remembers this as so.

BM: As a social worker she saw separate wings. She only had one negative encounter with Dr. Jolly – a good friend of Mary’s and of the native peoples around Stoney Creek. She went to Nanaimo for a signing and saw Dr. Jolly there. He said he was angry about the book and wanted to know why, if there was racism, didn’t MJ go and talk to someone. BM asked him who MJ would talk to, the Mayor? She explained that when you are repressed you don’t feel you can go and talk to someone in power. He felt Stoney Creek had been so wonderful for him and the knowledge of this racism distressed him. With her second book, nothing bad yet has come out of it, yet she’s heard nothing really out of Vanderhoof. Most people accept that there is racism and take it from there. Going to Vanderfhoof with Mary is like going to Vanderhoof with royalty. Her own reserve is also very proud of her.

MJ: Indian people are very shy and she wondered how her people would react to the book. Everyone who read the book liked it.

BM: 100’s of people told her that after reading the book they just didn’t realize the situation. Mary’s life has then broadened their understanding of what it meant to be native and a native woman.

MJ: She speaks to her sister-in-law or Veronica about the old days and the young people.

MJ: The reserve has a special constable from the Queen Charlottes who comes and visits her all the time. He is native but he is scared of the Carrier people. She tells him he is welcome, and to feel at home. His boss had told him to go from door to door on the reserve to see who’s living there. He doesn’t want to and she tells him not to, unless he’s asked in. His boss came to see her. She told him that plan wasn’t good and he listened.

BM: Mary has a daughter-in-law who is in the RCMP in Ft. St. James.

MJ: She was in Vancouver working in dispatch. She came home, but now she’s in Regina for more training.

MJ: Her people still have the RCMP out for salmon feast every year. They like it better at Wedgewood. She cooks bannock over the fire.

Instructor: Thank you very much.

Clapping from audience.

Mary & Lazare John’s 60th Anniversary Party – Part I

File consists of a videocassette (VHS) recording of Mary & Lazare John's 60th Anniversary Party.

Videocassette Summary

Context: Celebratory events for Mary and Lazare John’s 60th Wedding Anniversary, 1989.

Introduction: Party held in an auditorium. Head table in front of a curtained stage, decorated with a blue tablecloth. Streamers and pink, white and blue balloons provide a backdrop for the head table. Silver paper bells decorate the front of the table with a larger “60” sign on the front centre of the tablecloth. There is a large wedding cake situated between Lazare and Mary on the centre of the head table. Pink and white balloons and streamers decorate the walls of the hall.

The party begins with a prayer – the focus is on the head table. Guests seated at long tables are passing along the food, eating and talking. The camera pans in and out to the head table and surveys guests.

Mary and Lazare’s daughter, Winnie, stands behind the head table and addresses the guests. She tells a joke about her parents and then goes to sit down.

An unidentified man approaches the head table and pours drinks for those seated there.

Edward John approaches the head table and shakes both Lazare’s and Mary’s hands. He then talks with them and other guests at the head table for quite awhile.

Young people approach the head table and take photographs of the anniversary couple.

An elderly woman speaks briefly to Mary and Lazare from behind the table. Another woman in a wheelchair speaks to Mary and other guests at the head table.

Edward John (EJ) – EJ introduces himself as the MC and speaks at back of head table to the guests. He asks for round of applause for Lazare and Mary for being able to live with each other or 60yrs. The day they were married, they had no wedding cake, so the cake on the table is to make up for that. 60 years ago, Lazare never said “I do” at the ceremony and Mary is still waiting. He introduces their 9 children from their marriage included the 2 that died: Helen, who was active in Stoney Creek affairs, tribal council and Indian Homemakers Assoc. of BC and Charles (don’t know too much about him). He then introduces the children still remaining: Winnie, Bernice, Florence, Ernie, Gordon, Johnnie and Ray. The anniversary couple have 32 grandchildren, and 25 great-granchildren: many children, grandchildren, great grandchildren. Before asking couple to cut their cake, he introduces speakers. First up is Aileen Kimble (AK) from Vanderhoof.

AK: Friends with the couple for many years, happy anniversary Lazare and Mary.

EJ: No set agenda for this event, just time to celebrate and spend time with the couple. There are 30 people from Sechelt (nieces and nephews) that came up for this event: Valerie and Ken, Randy and Lani, Audrey, Willard, Janice, Bradley and Leonora, Wayne, Rena and Earl, Clarke. (applause) EJ calls on Bridget Moran (BM) to speak.

BM: Told a story about Mary’s wedding day, and when she first came to Stoney Creek. She touches a bit upon Stoney Creek Woman.

David: Tells a story about trapping with Grandfather Lazare. He thanks everyone for coming.

Winnie: Thanks siblings and Dorothy MacIntyre for helping her decorate the “leaning tower of Stoney Creek”. Also thanks Adela and Nicholas George for decorating the wishing well.

EJ: Mary’s cousin from Prince Rupert George and Emily Bird recently celebrated their 50th (?) wedding anniversary. Long time friend is Selina John (SJ), elder to tribal council called to speak.

SJ: She is so happy to be sitting next to sister-in-law. Ever since they both married they worked together. Raising their children together, they were like one big family. Not one cross word between them in 60 years. They’ve been through a lot but one thing stands out – during the day they took care of family and if they had time they would hunt squirrel in the bush. One time they were hunting squirrel and they got lost and it took them forever to find their way home. They came home hungry, frozen and tired and met with husbands who were furious because they thought they had been chasing boys. She talks to young people about the example Mary and Lazare’s marriage should be to the whole community- 60 years they’ve been together. The young generation of today, each walks in their own direction. If you want to have a good life you have to work at it. Marriage is a contract. If you marry you have to work towards it. She’s very proud of her sister-in-law, many times SJ was down especially after her husband died and MJ pulls her up. She wishes Mary and Lazare many more anniversaries to come.

EJ: Calls Sophie Thomas (ST) to say a few words.

ST: Wishes the couple a happy 60th anniversary and many more. She worked together with Mary for the people on reserve. Since they started the fought for running water, now they have sewer.

EJ: Calls Veronica to say a few words.

Veronica: She very happy to be there- to see Mary on her 60th wedding anniversary. It isn’t easy. Mary has faith in the Lord. She didn’t forget her mother’s and grandmother’s words. You have to listen when an elder talks to you. People come to elders for advice and direction and spiritual words too. So it is nice to see Mary and Lazare reach their 60 years of marriage – this is a very holy thing. Holy matrimony is important to keep. She hopes the young generation will take an example from Mary. It is not good to divorce. Always pray. She thanks many people for coming. May the Good Lord look after you wherever you are.

EJ: There are a few more speakers, elders mostly. Mary Pius (MP) from Heightly (?)

MP: Her Aunty Mary and Uncle Lazare have done so much for the people of Stoney Creek. Mary was one of last midwives. She took the baby into world and would help nurse along the young mothers too. Now you have nurses, doctors, hospitals, but we still have to work just as hard to keep the young mothers going. The young generation is still here because of the hard work of Mary and Lazare. We thank them for all the hard work to keep the young ones going. They take care of those who are sick, and help supply Indian medicine. She hopes the good Lord will reward her aunt and uncle and wishes them the best from the Holy Spirit. She wishes good luck to her Aunty Mary and Uncle Lazare.

EJ: There are a couple more speakers, then cutting of the cake, then a 60th anniversary waltz and some entertainment. EJ calls Justa Monk (JM), who has worked with Mary at tribal level carrying on business through the whole tribal area, and who has been deputy chief, past tribal council president and chairman.

JM: In the short time he has known the couple, he has learned many things in his culture and about society today. He is honoured to be there sharing their food. He talks about Lazare’s speaking in church. What they have done in Stoney Creek has spread to other reserves like his. He wishes them well.

EJ: When the couple married 60 years ago, they didn’t have any money. They borrowed $25 from his brother. Lazare went to work and Mary worked too. Lazare worked at a railway tie camp. EJ calls on Evelyn Louie (EL) to speak.

EL: She’s really happy for the couple. She thanks them very much for everything.

EJ: Introduces Ellen Lasert from Burns Lake

EL: She is an apprentice under Mary John. Mary has been an inspiration to her and she brings greetings from people in Burns Lake and Chief (?) Charlie.

[Winnie speaks to Edward John]

EJ: Calls on Cecile Patrick to speak.

CP: She wishes her uncle and auntie a happy anniversary from their family. Thanks everyone for the food and effort in preparing food. She is the second eldest daughter of Lazare’s sister.

EJ: Comments: Lazare and Mary’s doors in Stoney Creek are always open. Every time you visit you are always treated with respect and made to feel at home. He has these wonderful memories of this couple. She always has her smokehouse and her wood fire going all the time. She always has tea ready. He asks Lazare and Mary to cut the cake for the 60th wedding anniversary.

[Lazare and Mary pose with a knife ready to cut the cake. Guests rise to take photographs. Then Mary rises again and tries to remove the cake topper and cut the cake for her guests but it doesn’t cut easily. They are finally told there is already cake for the guests in the kitchen.]

EJ: Calls on Bob Holmes (on piano?) and Jen Hoffner (on accordion) to come to the front.

The recording breaks and screen goes black for a second

Picture resumes and Lazare and Mary are seen doing the anniversary waltz. They dance for a bit and then sit down, but another gentleman takes Mary up front again to continue dancing (a son?).

EJ: Announces the entertainment: the young dancers from Stoney Creek and the PG dancers. He calls dancers to the floor; while waiting he tells a story about a blind snake and a blind rabbit.

Drummers gather and begin to play and sing. Stoney Creek dancers (children of all ages) come to the centre of the dance floor to perform. Second dance is called the “Beaver Dance”. The third dance is called the “ -inaudible- Dance”. The fourth dance is called the “Four Winds Dance”.

Tape ends.

The Community as an Agent for Change: A series of videotapes about the native people of the Stony Creek Band

File consists of a videocassette (VHS) recording of the following:

  • The Community as an agent for Change: a series of videotapes about the native people of the Stony [sic] Creek Band.
  • Mary John and Bridget Moran speaking at the College of New Caledonia [incomplete version]
  • Mary & Lazare John’s 60th Anniversary Party – Part I [incomplete version]

Videocassette Summary [1]
Title: The Community as an agent for Change: a series of videotapes about the native people of the Stony [sic] Creek Band.
Date: February 1979

Context: The Community as an agent for Change: a series of videotapes about the native people of the Stony (sic) Creek Band. Video produced by the Rural Resource Project, School of Social Work at the University of Victoria, 1979. Five women interviewed by an unidentified man (Q) include: Mary John (MJ), Sophie Thomas (ST), Celena John (CJ) and 2 unidentified women (A). Interview location: Stoney Creek reserve.

Introduction: Video begins with Mary and Lazare drumming and singing with other elders.

In Feb. 1979, the Rural Resource Project of the School of Social Work at the University of Victoria was invited to the Stoney Creek reservation to document their unique culture and to share their success in dealing with community issues especially those concerning the welfare of their children.

Identification of Vanderhoof, and the location of the Stoney Creek reservation

The Stoney Creek band encompasses 400 people. The band is a member of the Carrier Nation.

A: How the Carrier people got their name. Years ago, when a man died and the woman is still alive, they would build a big fire- they didn’t bury their dead in those days. They would put the corpse on the fire and burn it, while drums and dancing carried on; and this wouldn’t end until all was burnt. The widow would then pick up the ashes and put it in a bag and carry them wherever she went - for a year: that is how they got their name –Carrier. They carry their dead. When this year was up, her in-laws would hold a party for widow, if her people were good to her. They would dress her up and let her go. That is how they would treat their in-laws. That is how they were taught.

Q: In what ways did your people deal with problems before the welfare system?
MJ: In the old days when she was growing up, they didn’t have social problems. If there were problems such as quarrels or gossiping about one another, these [disruptive] people appeared before the hereditary chief and the watchmen- who were like councilors- like in a court. The chief would listen to both sides and then make a decision on how to solve problems. There were lots of ways they could solve problems. There was one man she remembered who was kind of like a social worker. After he had his tea in the morning he would go through the village into every house, and he would see to it that everyone had enough to eat for the day, and who was sick - he would do something about it. He would make sure people had enough food by getting others to give him some of their food and he would pass it along to the families who weren’t doing so well. He would give you a word of advice now and then. He was something like a social worker, he was really concerned about the whole village.

Q: How did the reserve as a community deal with problem children? Such as children who would stay out too late and cause problems for the parents.
A: The Chief would make a law for children who stay out too late at night. The Watchmen would take the children to Indian court and the Chief would fine them a $1. The children weren’t out late again. Things were strict back then.

A: They had severe laws. They would even have to kill [a troublemaker], or make that person go away – disown them when they did something really bad, like running around with another man’s wife. That was a crime and they would make them leave the band, or even kill them.

Q: You talk of your experiences as young girl growing up on the reserve. You talk about how self-sufficient you were with no reliance on welfare. What did you rely on?
CJ: The trap lines were just full. We had fishing rights – we could fish anytime we felt like it. We trapped according to season. We did berry picking too. We met all our provisions. All that was there they just had to do it and put food up for winter. It was hard but they got by. We would sell our furs and had money to buy any clothing or groceries they needed. We lived from the land. We had cattle, horses for transportation, and chickens and pigs - everything. We lived off the land. That was a good life.

Q: Young people today seem to have lost the ability to hunt and fish the way you used to; and a lot of the wildlife isn’t there anymore. Many people can’t get work and so rely on a welfare check. Do you think that is a problem on the reserve? They have a lot of free time with nothing to do.
A: Lots of boys graduate from highschool. The government spends lots of money on them. They graduate, they go back to reserve and have no jobs, they get frustrated and then turn to booze.
They need the help, they need jobs. There are no jobs here on reserve – nothing.

Q: How could we change the situation; the severe alcohol problems. What are some things you would like to tell social workers about the way they could help make a difference?
SJ: I don’t know how any social worker will help the people unless the people help themselves.

Q: Do you think things are getting worse?
MJ: This last year? I don’t think so. The drinking is getting worse. But I think the neglecting of children is not too bad, but the drinking is bad. A few people are drinking who have children.
But there are the regular ones.

Q: Some things were discussed at the Child Welfare Committee re: dealing with the alcoholic parents neglecting their children: that these parents shouldn’t just receive welfare, they should be made to do something for themselves like chop their own wood to keep their home warm. That would give them something to do so they wouldn’t be so bored.
MJ: That would help. She’s been thinking of all kinds of ideas. Why can’t they think of something that would pay for itself? One thing she was thinking about was raising fish. They are doing that in Duncan.

Q: Should the DIA maybe be involved in suggesting these sorts of things to help them use these kinds of resources?
MJ: Yes, to get rid of welfare system, they have to do something. [She is very much against welfare]. It has spoiled my people and they can’t undo it.

Q: What are your hopes for the future of your own people?
MJ: I hope someday they will smarten up.

Videocassette Summary [2]
Title: Mary John and Bridget Moran speaking at the College of New Caledonia [incomplete version]
Date: March 12, 1991

Context: Bridget Moran and Mary John speaking to students at CNC, specific class unidentified.

Introduction: Bridget identifies that she will make the introductory speech and Mary will answer any questions because Mary doesn’t like to make speeches even though she is very good at it….

Video recording breaks during Bridget’s introduction and resumes with MJ answering her first question.

MJ: …. She speaks about how free her people used to be. They could stop and make camp anywhere – this was no longer the case as all is private property. There are greater alcohol problems in north. They are holding workshops in Stoney Creek to help the young people. The older people know what to do, beadwork, etc. the young people don’t like to do traditional tasks, even for cash. The elders try to teach them. She has about 5 boys working doing wood for elders but they have no axe so she had to get one for them They are so poor on reserves. The elders try everything – elders tried a wood processing plant - for 10yrs they studied this. Had people from Switzerland and Germany lined up who wanted the wood but they still didn’t get anywhere….

Tape ends

Videocassette Summary [3]
Title: Mary & Lazare John’s 60th Anniversary Party – Part I [incomplete version]
Date: 11 June 1989

Context: Celebratory events for Mary and Lazare John’s 60th Wedding Anniversary, 1989.

Introduction: Party held in an auditorium. Head table in front of a curtained stage, decorated with a blue tablecloth. Streamers and pink, white and blue balloons provide a backdrop for the head table. Silver paper bells decorate the front of the table with a larger “60” sign on the front centre of the tablecloth.
There is a large wedding cake situated between Lazare and Mary on the centre of the head table. Pink and white balloons and streamers decorate the walls of the hall.

Video begins midway through the first dance between Lazare and Mary and ends soon after.

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