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Thomas Crosby Mission Ship Photograph Collection
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Eulachon boiling tanks on the river's edge

Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "In the foreground is the boiling tanks for the ooligans. A fire is lit in the tanks then big stones heated red hot. When the water becomes boiling hot then the ooligans are shoveled in & left over night. During the night, skin & bones settle to bottom & fat comes to the top. Then with a board the width of the tank, pails hung on a spout at the end of the tank, and fat is scraped into the pails and used for butter. In the background is the smokehouse."

Memorial dedicated to Ligeex, Head Chief of Port Simpson

Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "Native Lucaie (aka: Legaic or Ligeex) Head Chief at Pt. Simpson, tomb stone on the beach." Text on headstone reads: "In memory of First Lecaie, A Head Chief, died a long time ago before the white people came, also three other Head Chiefs named Lecaie, also Paul Lecaie a Head chief of the Tsimpshans Nation who died a Christian by at Port Simpson, B.C. Jan 7, 1891, Aged 45 years. Paul Lecaie said the day he died to his people: 'One thing I hope, I would die in a lonely place, so no one would see me and I hope my people will not find me for five hours, for I think I should be in Heaven by that time and if they find my body after that...they can do as they will.' His body was found 8 hours after God gave him more than he hoped for.”

Opening of Grace United Church in Port Simpson

Clergy standing at the entryway to the newly reconstructed church as the choir walks towards them in two lines. The attendant congregation watches. The original Grace Methodist Church had been dedicated in the late 1800s and had its name changed to Grace United Church with Church Union in 1925; it was destroyed by fire, however, in 1931. Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "Opening of new church 1938."

Opening of Grace United Church in Port Simpson

Clergy standing at the entryway to Grace United Church speaking to a crowd gathered to witness the opening of this newly reconstructed church. The original Grace Methodist Church had been dedicated in the late 1800s and had its name changed to Grace United Church with Church Union in 1925; it was destroyed by fire, however, in 1931. Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "Opening of new church 1938. The left hand row of people with the white collars were the P.S. Choir. The right hand row was the band & Chair from Metlakatla, Alaska."

Port Essington hospital staff group photo

Five men and four women pose for a group photo on boardwalk stairwell at Port Essington Hospital. Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "The staff at the summer Hospital at Port Essington to accommodate the native fishermen & families also other people on the Skeena. Centre row: Miss Clark, myself & Miss Hall. Front row: our cook Salamoe & helper on the boat. Top L. : Summer doctor Dr. Ashley Armstrong, caretaker Mr. Brown, laundry man".

Thomas Crosby Mission Ship Photograph Collection

  • 2009.21
  • Collection
  • 1932-1946

Subject areas identified in this collection include: church and hospital buildings (including nurses quarters); group photos featuring doctors, nurses, and hospital workers; grave markers; landscapes; processing of oolichan fish; and various church-related events such as weddings and church openings.

Thomas Crosby Mission Ships

Three women standing on a boardwalk

Three women, two wearing hats and pants and one in a dress, stand together in front of what is possibly the Hudson's Bay Store. The woman on the left is Mrs. Huston, wife of the Hudson's Bay Company store manager. Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "Light House caretakers, wife in centre, Lady with cap on, wife of ....the Hudson Bay Store at 1932 ."

Wedding procession in Port Simpson

Group photo featuring a young First Nations bride, her father, flower girl and attendants in front of a house just before leaving for the Church.
Handwritten annotation on verso reads: "A Native bride leaving her home with some of her attendants on the way to the church. At the ceremony in the church she had 14 tendants (sic) & 14 men."